Razor Burn Can Cause an Itchy Male Organ


Posted March 6, 2020 by man1health

Many men find that manscaping makes their members more appealing to partners, but it does carry the risk of razor burn – and that in turn may bring about a case of an itchy male organ.

 
As a quick glance around the locker room may confirm, more and more men are manscaping nowadays. Whether it’s a total torso right-to-the-skin shave or just a neat-and-tidy trim of the pubic hair, it’s common now for men to take their razors and move below the neck nowadays. As long as a guy is appropriately careful when shaving the manhood and sacks, there’s no overt male organ health issue, of course. But there can be a secondary issue when manscaping leads to razor burn, namely an itchy male organ.

Razor burn

Most men who are regular shavers already have some familiarity with razor burn. Also known as razor bumps or barber’s itch, and clinically called pseudofolliculitis barbae (when anywhere on the body) or pseudofolliculitis pubis (when specifically on the member, sacks or midsection), razor burn is a situation where small, raised red bumps appear after shaving. (Although typically not immediately after shaving; at first, skin appears to feel smooth as a baby’s behind, but the bumps soon present.)

And those bumps come accompanied by the need to scratch. Yes, an itchy male organ is in the cards for most guys with razor burn in the midsection. (for the record, in some cases, there can be other symptoms related to razor burn. The red bumps may worsen into solid, larger bumps or may even become pus-filled blisters. In these cases, there may also be some pain accompanying the razor burn.)

Razor burn is more likely to occur in men with curly hair (especially curly pubic hair). That’s because the hair follicle meets some obstacle when trying to break through the skin, curling back underneath instead and causing the bumps to appear.

Treatment

Even if the only symptoms are the little bumps and an itchy male organ, razor burn can be very annoying. Guys get easily embarrassed when caught with their hand on their midsection, scratching away. And potential partners see such an action and wonder if they just can’t keep their hands off themselves or if there may be something like crabs causing the itchy male organ.

So what should a guy do to treat the razor burn and help banish the itchy male organ? There are seveal things.

• Grab a shower. Clearly, keeping the body clean is an excellent idea in its own right, but taking a nice, warm shower can help with razor burn. Why? Because warm water relaxes the skin and helps the pores to open, and open pores make it easier for the trapped pubic hair to find a way out. Incorporating a wet, soapy rough (but not too rough) washcloth into the process is even better; the washcloth helps exfoliate (remove dead skin cells), which further makes it easier for the pores to open. (Do not use a rough exfoliating treatment on the manhood; the skin is too sensitive.)

• Moisturize. Male member skin benefits from being well moisturized in general; it can be especially helpful with this problem, as the moisturization makes the skin more tender, allowing the trapped follicles to break through the skin surface more easily.

• Apply a warm (not hot) compress. Again, the heat from the compress helps the skin relax and the pores to open. (It’s all about helping those curled follicles to escape!)

• Keep it loose. Wearing tight clothes may show off a guy’s package, but it can irritate his itchy male organ and the razor burn. Loose boxers and baggier trousers are the order of the day until the burn is gone.

Treating itchy male organ from razor burn is easier if a guy daily applies a superior male organ health oil (health professionals recommend Man 1 Man Oil, which is clinically proven mild and safe for skin). The key is to select an oil that will help moisturize, such as one with both a high end emollient (such as shea butter) and a natural hydrator (such as vitamin E). The oil should also contain vitamin B5, aka pantothenic acid, which is a vital nutrient that is required for cell metabolism and the maintenance of healthy tissue.

Visit http://www.menshealthfirst.com for additional information on most common male organ health issues, tips on improving male member sensitivity and what to do to maintain a healthy manhood. John Dugan is a professional writer who specializes in men's health issues and is an ongoing contributing writer to numerous websites.
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Issued By John Dugan
Country United States
Categories Fitness , Health , Medical
Tags itchy male organ , razor burn , male organ health oil
Last Updated March 6, 2020