Cadiopulmonary resuscitation in infants


Posted April 3, 2013 by keithlouisst

These steps are based on the standards of cardiopulmonary resuscitation but do not replace it. The american heart association cpr nashville tn offers in their basic life support course are according to the standards and are always updated.

 
Cadiopulmonary resuscitation in infants
1. Survey the scene
If the scene is safe, approach the victim immediately
If the scene is not safe, bring the victim and the bystanders to a safe and secure place.
2. Inform the infant’s guardian, introduce yourself (state your name and inform that you are a trained rescuer) as consent to help
If consent is given take the infant from the guardian and place the infant in a smooth, hard and flat surface in supine position. If consent is not given, explain to the guardian the need to help the infant. Stay with the infant until the guardian gives consent for you to help.
3. Assess the infant’s consciousness by tickling the sole of the infant’s foot. Observe if the infant is breathing thru the presence of chest rise and fall. If the infant does not respond or has no breathing, activate emergency medical services. Ask the infant’s guardian to tell the emergency responders to bring infant bag valve mask and manual automated external defibrillator. Instruct the guardian to drop the call last.
4. Check the brachial pulse at the inner aspect of the infant’s upper arm using two or more fingers (excluding the thumb) of one hand for a minimum of 5 and a maximum of 10 seconds
If the infant has no pulse and has no breathing, perform CPR, If the infant has a pulse but no breathing, perform rescue breathing. If the infant has a pulse and has breathing, hold the infant in a burping position which is the infant’s recovery position.
5. Provide CPR. A cycle of it consists of 30 chest compressions and two breaths. Perform 5 cycles of CPR within two minutes (approximately 20 seconds per cycle) after 5 minutes of CPR, look, listen and feel for breathing and check the infant’s brachial pulse.
6. In performing chest compressions, use only two fingers (ring and middle fingers of one hand). Locate the chest compression site, one fingerbreadth below the imaginary nipple line. Support the infant’s head with the other hand. Compress to a depth of 1/3 to ½ of the infant’s chest and at a rate of at least 100 chest compressions a minute. Do not pause between compressions. Release the pressure on the infant’s chest completely without letting the rescuer’s fingers lose contact with the infant’s chest.
7. Provide rescue breaths; open the infant’s airway using the head tilt chin lift maneuver in neutral position. Give breaths using mouth to mouth and nose ventilation, open your mouth wide enough to cover the infant’s mouth and nose and do not allow exhaled air to escape. Provide a gentle blow in every breath, enough to make the infant’s chest to rise. After giving 2 breaths, perform another cycle of chest compressions. Give 40 rescue breaths within two minutes.
These steps are based on the standards of cardiopulmonary resuscitation but do not replace it. The CPR Nashville offers in their basic life support course are according to the standards and are always updated.
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Issued By Keith Harper
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Country United States
Categories Health , Education
Tags Health , Education , CPR , Basic Life Support , Advanced Cardiac Life Support , american heart association
Last Updated October 28, 2013